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A forest is not a crop

A forest is not a crop

By ARBA

A forest is a complex natural ecosystem, dominated by local indigenous tree species and their accompanying vegetation, animals, fungi, and soil microorganisms. All these elements establish lasting interrelationships with each other, self-sufficient without the need for human intervention, it is therefore not a set of uniform trees of the same age.


A forest is a complex natural ecosystem, dominated by local indigenous tree species and their accompanying vegetation, animals, fungi, and soil microorganisms. All these elements establish lasting interrelationships with each other, self-sufficient without the need for human intervention, it is therefore not a set of uniform trees of the same age.

There are many functions that we know of forests, although we still have many others to find out, to which ecophysiology or forest ecology tries to respond. Among the functions that forests perform and that are of vital importance for the human race, the following could be highlighted:

They regulate the water cycle. The wooded masses retain rainwater, facilitate a slow infiltration into the soil.

When it rains on a forest, the falling water is held back by the "roof" formed by the tops of the tallest trees, and then slowly drains from the leaves along the trunks, cushioning the force of its fall and the loss of soil due to erosion. , facilitating the recharge of aquifers


The leaves intercept between 15 and 30 percent of the rainwater and a 15 percent more does the trunk and branches, preventing it from hitting the ground directly.

They prevent erosion and create soil. Retaining the earth with its network of roots, in addition to the fall of plant matter and other organic remains, when decomposed by the action of microorganisms and mineralized, they form a fertile soil.

Oxygen Producers. It has always been said and we continue to maintain that forests and mountains are the green lungs of the Earth. The chlorophyll function, among other functions, consists of taking CO2 from the air and releasing oxygen.

A forest generates between two and three times more oxygen than any other type of crop of the same area. One hectare of hardwoods generates between 10 and 20 tons of oxygen per year.

They fix and accumulate carbon dioxide. The capture and fixation of carbon dioxide (CO2) exerted by forests is essential, especially at this time when human activity has increased its polluting emissions into the atmosphere. It is uncertain, as has been proclaimed by certain wood producers, that young forests fix more carbon dioxide than mature ones.

They influence the climate. In continental areas, more than 50% of the humidity in the air is due to the water pumped by the roots and transpired by the leaves of the vegetation. When forests are cut down, the climate becomes drier. A forest is capable of maintaining its own climatic conditions and producing a tempering of the climate in a wide area.


Two illustrative examples: in a beech forest the temperature in full haze is 5 or 6 ºC lower than outside it; In an olive grove it is the opposite, in winter its interior raises the outside temperature by 2 to 3 ºC.

They host a large number of species. Forests offer a multitude of different habitats, so you can find a great variety of animal and plant species in them. They are therefore the main reserves of biological diversity.

They exert a purifying action. Different polluting substances from the atmosphere and water are retained and filtered by the living beings of the forest.

They provide landscape value. The forests break the uniformity and monotony of the space in which they sit, providing a high-quality visual oasis. In addition to stimulating our thoughts, giving us peace and calm, they serve us as leisure, rest.

The same cannot be said of a forest crop, which is a plantation of plant species of commercial interest, aligned, of the same age and generally non-native to the area, since they are outside their natural geographic area.

The species most used historically have been pines, eucalyptus and varieties of poplars. At present, some autochthonous is planted, but almost always of other genotypes different from those of the area, when not, species that do not correspond to that plant ecosystem. Its negative impact on the natural environment is very notable, especially when these forestry actions have been preceded by the elimination of the vegetation cover typical of the area. In addition, crops usually carry a set of silvicultural actions that exacerbate the environmental impact already produced.

The different administrations have been promoting the "industrialization" of the mountain, filling everything with forest crops. The excuse is that millions of trees have to be planted to fight climate change, but the reality is that the objective pursued is to empower the wood and paper companies and the managers of these actions, otherwise, no we would understand that existing forests continue to be destroyed, knowing the benefits they provide us.

At ARBA we think that the creation of new groves should be governed by two principles:

1º Maintain and enhance natural forests, in these the silvicultural tasks must be directed to the elimination of exotic and non-native species from the area, and to the restoration of other environmental impacts, leaving them later quiet to recover on their own.

2º the new plantations must be made with species of the place, introducing other species does not diversify or enrich the forest, on the contrary, it is detrimental to the species, both animals and plants, that after hundreds of years of adaptation they see as their habitat it degrades and disappears.

We are aware that society needs the wood and paper industry, we are equally aware that these demands must be covered with forest plantations (crops), and these can be carried out on abandoned agricultural lands, avoiding the destruction of more hectares of forest and allowing these their recovery, extension and evolution.

For some time now our association has been repeating a series of placards and actions to remind administrations of any kind that their task is to conserve and enhance our mountains, that is, everyone's mountains, and not to carry out botched repopulations, where any species, provided it is green, is feasible to be planted.

ARBA (Association for the Recovery of Native Forests)
www.arba-s.org


Video: PC No Crop How to remove Renderforest Watermark and Audio from Renderforest Video. GTekSD (May 2021).